Click on Above Link to View
Information Regarding Donna's
Case on Americas Most Wanted.
Click on Above Link to View
Information Regarding Donna's
Case on ABC News.
But, Heather Dawn Harley-Davidson said she had no idea about the man's checkered past, or that he was
a person of interest in a crime across the country.

John Stephen Burgess was arrested last week, after deputies with the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office caught
him dropping some cocaine off at a local motel.

Once inside the jail, the JSO received word that Burgess was a registered sex offender, wanted for
questioning in the disappearance of 19-year-old Donna Jou, a a student at the San Diego State University.

Prior to his arrest, Harley-Davidson said Burgess was working at the A1A Crab Shack and the Barrier
Island Restaurant and living in her third-floor penthouse overlooking the Intracoastal Waterway.

When she took Burgess in, Harley-Davidson said she knew he needed help after having legal troubles in
California, but she said she had no idea just how much trouble that was.

"[His mother] did not tell me he was a sex offender," Harley-Davidson said. "She told me she had gotten
him out of trouble in L.A., but never in my wildest dreams..."

For nearly two weeks, Burgess lived under her roof, but she said it was only after a few days that things
started to get odd.

"A down (feathered) pillow was sliced, like, right open," Harley-Davidson said, "and the TV was ripped
out of the wall."

But she said it wasn't until the cable went out that Burgess really freaked out.

"He was very excited that the news was not on," she said. "And he had made the comment that he was a
news buff -- he had to watch the news. I think he wanted to watch the news so he could see his face
plastered all over it."

Harley-Davidson said she knew she had to get Burgess out of her house when she found a pipe with
marijuana in his room.

"My son told me this," she said. "I'm calling my brother saying 'get him out of my house -- do it now.'"

After hearing the news that Burgess may be linked to Jou's disappearance, Harley-Davidson said she told
investigators everything she knew about him, and hopes it can lead them to the missing college student.

According to the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, they are not the investigating agency on the disappearance,
but that they are simply holding him on unrelated drug charges.
The detective handling the case out of California said, so far, there's been no extradition date set to bring
him back, but investigators are questioning him and have plans to look into Harley-Davidson's computer
files to see if he was doing anything inappropriate while living with her.
Laptop clue to missing woman?
Police to search computer from motel room of molester wanted for questioning in disappearance of
Donna Jou, 19.
The Orange County Register

molester wanted for questioning in the disappearance of a 19-year-old Rancho Santa Margarita student
will be examined for information that may help lead to the missing woman, authorities said Wednesday.

bougainvillea vines near the railroad tracks a mile and a half from the home John Steven Burgess, 35,
who calls himself Sinjin Stevens, disappeared from he rented.

LAPD investigators have scoured the area around the railroad tracks as well as the wilderness trails at
Malibu State Park, which Burgess loved. But there still has been no sign of 19-year-old Donna Jou since
June 23, when her mother and brother watched her hop on the back of Burgess' motorcycle outside
their Rancho Santa Margarita apartment and drive away. Jou told her mother a friend's boyfriend was
picking her up – not a stranger she met through the Internet bulletin board craigslist.org.

Burgess' pickup, a 1998 blue Ford Ranger, turned up in a Jacksonville neighborhood last Friday – a
man who saw news coverage of Jou's disappearance turned it in. Authorities are waiting for a judge to
sign off on a search warrant so they can look inside, said Dan Salcedo, the Orange County Sheriff's
Department lead investigator on the case.

Burgess also has a sailboat called Sinjin's Sanctuary, which he kept at San Pedro Harbor and rented to
another registered sex offender. Investigators have talked to the man, and harbor officials confirmed
the 1963 Challenger has not left its slip, Sheriff's spokesman Jim Amormino said.

His motorcycle – the one he used to pick up Jou – is still missing.

Burgess sits in a Jacksonville jail, refusing to talk about Jou after being arrested last week on suspicion
of cocaine possession. He's being held on a $1 million California warrant for failing to register as a sex
offender and a $5,000 bond on the drug charge. It could be weeks before he is extradited to California
to face charges on the warrant. He has not been named a suspect in Jou's disappearance. Because he
has already refused to talk, investigators cannot continue to question Burgess about Jou.

Sheriff's Department and LAPD investigators searched the three-bedroom Los Angeles home Burgess
rented and sublet. Burgess had packed the tiny 1920s house with students from Russia, Poland and
Bulgaria, who answered his ads he posted on craigslist.org. Burgess charged them hundreds of dollars a
month for little more than a mattress on the floor. There was even someone staying in the kitchen
where a dining table should have been. Dingy patterned sheets separated rooms. There was little
furniture. Everyone lived out of suitcases. The house was “420-friendly” – it didn't object to marijuana
– and they had get-togethers every other Saturday in the big backyard, Burgess promised in his online
ads.

On the road, Burgess sent an e-mail to the Orange County Sheriff's Department, trying to explain his
thoughts and feelings about what had happened to Donna Jou, said Burgess' mother, Patricia Berdet.
The department had received an e-mail from someone claiming to be Burgess, Salcedo said, but
investigators have not been able to confirm it was sent by Burgess – and he's not talking.

Berdet told the Register in an interview last week that her son was running because he hadn't kept up
on his sex offender registration as he was required to do after a 2003 conviction for a lewd and
lascivious act on a 14-year-old girl. She denied he had anything to do with Jou's disappearance.

“There were other people at that party,” Berdet said. “Not just my son.”

Contact the writer: 714-796-7829 or kedds@ocregister.com
Extradition waived in missing teen case


© 2007 The Associated Press

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SANTA ANA, Calif. — A convicted sex offender wanted for questioning in the disappearance of a 19-year-old college student has pleaded guilty to a
drug charge in Florida and waived extradition to California, his attorney said.


He pleaded guilty to a third-degree felony charge for possession of crack in Florida and waived extradition to California last week, said George Bird Jr.,
his attorney.

"He's just waiting for the police from Los Angeles to come pick him up," Bird said.

Jou was last seen on June 23 getting on the back of Burgess' motorcycle to head to a party at his rented house in West Los Angeles.

Jou, a biology student at San Diego State University, sent a text message to her mother the following day saying that her cell phone battery was dying,
but she would be home soon. She has not been heard from since.

Two weeks after Jou disappeared, residents found a black plastic tool box in the street 1 1/2 miles from Burgess' house, authorities have said. The box
contained a license plate, a pair of gloves, rope and a scrub brush. The license plate read SINJIN1, which authorities say represents Burgess' alias,
Sinjin Stevens. Investigators also found a motorcycle helmet in the box.

Burgess was arrested late last month in Jacksonville, Fla., after police there say they spotted him trying to dispose of a bag of crack cocaine outside a
Motel 6. They found his 1998 blue Ford Ranger truck several days later in the Jacksonville area, but his motorcycle is still missing.

Investigators initially sought two men as persons of interest. They now believe Burgess used the photo of another man while contacting Jou online.

Burgess was convicted of three counts of battery in 2002 and of performing a lewd act against a child the following year.
Houston chronicle Aug. 17, 2007
Suspect pleads not guilty in Jou's disappearance
John Steven Burgess makes first California court appearance on failure to register as sex offender.

By KIMBERLY EDDS
The Orange County Register

A convicted child molester now a suspect in the disappearance of a 19-year-old Rancho Santa Margarita student painted his blue pickup truck black and used
an assumed name apparently to avoid detection while on the run from California to Florida, authorities revealed Monday.

In a borrowed light-blue dress shirt and his shoulder length brown hair stringy, John Steven Burgess, 35, made his first California court appearance Monday
after being extradited. It was also the first time he was called a suspect –and not just a person of interest.

Hands, uncuffed, and stuffed in the pockets of grey dress pants, Burgess shuffled in with a smirk. With a southern drawl, he said little other than yes, sir
and no, sir when addressed by the judge. Minutes later he shuffled out – back to lock-up – but $750,000 closer to freedom while he awaits prosecution for
failing to register as a sex offender
Burgess has not been charged with any crime in connection with the disappearance of Donna Jou, who was last seen by her family June 23 driving away on
the back of Burgess' motorcycle.

Burgess, who goes by the name Sinjin Stevens, drove Jou to a party at his Los Angeles home that included drinking and using drugs, investigators said. The
two met on Craigslist.org.

Investigators continue to build their case with circumstantial evidence against the man they believe was the last person to see her alive, according to a
sworn statement by a LAPD detective read aloud by Judge Keith L. Schwartz Monday.

Schwartz reduced Burgess’ bail from $1 million to $250,000, still more than 10 times the amount laid out in the county’s bail schedule. Burgess, who faces
six years in prison if convicted, pleaded not guilty.

Schwartz was the same judge who raised Burgess’s bail from $40,000 to $1 million in July after reviewing the detective’s sworn statements. Burgess’
departure to Florida with the “foreknowledge that he was a suspect” in Jou’s disappearance, along with his habits of paying rent with cash, living under an
alias and failing to register as a sex offender in California, and again in Florida, warranted raising the bail, the detective argued.

“It’s a common pattern used by sex offenders to go under the radar … so there is no paper trail,” Schwartz said.

Inmates normally must post just 10 percent of a bail amount to a bail bondsman to be released.

Defense attorney George Bird Jr. said was unaware Burgess had been named a suspect in Jou’s disappearance until he heard it in court.

“The previous statements that my client was a person of interest and not a suspect were either disingenuous or intentionally false,” said Bird, who denies
Burgess had anything to do with Jou’s disappearance.

Burgess lied to Jacksonville police about his identity when he was arrested in July 24 on suspicion of cocaine possession, said Orange County Sheriff’s
Investigator Dan Salcedo.

Fingerprints turned up the California warrant for his arrest. Burgess was sentenced to 25 days of time served after pleading guilty to third-degree felony
crack possession last week. He waived extradition.

Burgess left Los Angeles on July 5, the same day investigators from the Orange County Sheriff's Department named him a person of interest in Jou's
disappearance, and broadcast his picture and description of his blue 1998 Ford Ranger pickup.

Three days later, Burgess’ truck’s tool box was found along railroad tracks. With the box were his custom license plates SINJIN 1, a motorcycle helmet, a
scrubbing brush, rubber gloves, and some rope. By the time Burgess arrived in Florida, the Ranger had been painted black, Sheriff’s spokesman Jim
Amormino said.
“It obviously helped him get there without being noticed,” Amormino said. “She was last seen with him He removed the truck’s license plates, he painted it
black, and he fled to Florida. These are all things that look pretty suspicious.”

John Steven Burgess, suspected in disappearance of Donna  
Jou of Rancho Santa Margarita, posts $250,000 bail.

By KIMBERLY EDDS
The Orange County Register

A convicted child molester suspected in the disappearance of a 19-year-old Rancho Santa Margarita student was released from a Los Angeles jail this morning after
posting $250,000 bail.

Charges have not been filed against John Steven Burgess, 35, in the mysterious disappearance of Donna Jou, who was last seen by her family June 23 driving away on
the back of Burgess' motorcycle. But investigators say they believe he is the last person to have seen the San Diego State student alive. Investigators in two counties
continue to search for Jou – and build their circumstantial case against the man they believe is responsible for her disappearance.

Burgess is scheduled to appear in court Sept. 5 on charges he failed to register as a sex offender. If convicted, he faces six years in prison.

Burgess, who goes by the name Sinjin Stevens, drove Jou to a party at his Los Angeles home that included drinking and using drugs, investigators said. The two met on
Craigslist.org. Jou was seen at the party – but hasn't been seen since.

Burgess walked out of the Men's Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles about 12:35 a.m. after posting bail, according to Los Angeles County jail records. Who provided
the bail money has not been publicly released.

Judge Keith L. Schwartz last week reduced Burgess' bail on the warrant from $1 million to $250,000, still more than 10 times the amount laid out in the county's bail
schedule. Burgess, who faces six years in prison if convicted, pleaded not guilty.

"In a case like this we would all like to see a higher bail, but the judge is governed by laws that say no excessive bail," said Orange County Sheriff's Department
spokesman Jim Amormino. "The world is too small for him to hide."

Schwartz was the same judge who, after reviewing sworn statements by an LAPD detective, raised Burgess's bail on the failure to register charge from $40,000 to $1
million in July. Burgess' departure to Florida with the "foreknowledge that he was a suspect" in Jou's disappearance, along with his habits of paying rent with cash, living
under an alias and failing to register as a sex offender in California, and again in Florida, warranted raising the bail, the detective argued.

"It's a common pattern used by sex offenders to go under the radar … so there is no paper trail," Schwartz said.

Inmates normally must post just 10 percent of a bail amount to a bail bondsman to be released.

Defense attorney George Bird Jr. said was unaware Burgess had been named a suspect in Jou's disappearance until he heard it in court.

"The previous statements that my client was a person of interest and not a suspect were either disingenuous or intentionally false," said Bird, who denies Burgess had
anything to do with Jou's disappearance.

Burgess left Los Angeles on July 5, the same day investigators from the Orange County Sheriff's Department named him a person of interest in Jou's disappearance, and
broadcast his picture and description of his blue 1998 Ford Ranger pickup.

Three days later, Burgess' truck's toolbox was found along railroad tracks. With the box were his custom license plates SINJIN 1, a motorcycle helmet, a scrubbing
brush, rubber gloves, and some rope.

Detectives tracked Burgess to San Francisco, Las Vegas, Tucson, and then to Jacksonville. He had painted his blue pickup black and used an assumed name apparently to
avoid detection while on the run from California to Florida, Amormino said.

Burgess lied to Jacksonville police about his identity when he was arrested in July 24 on suspicion of cocaine possession, said Orange County sheriff's Investigator Dan
Salcedo.

Fingerprints turned up the California warrant for his arrest. Burgess was sentenced to 25 days of time served after pleading guilty to third-degree felony crack possession
last week. He waived extradition.

"He was last seen with her. He removed his truck's license plates, he painted it black, and he fled to Florida," Amormino said. "These are all things that look pretty
suspicious."
Attorney Gloria Allred, center, along with Reza and Nili Jou.
The Orange County Register

LOS ANGELES – Carrying yellow signs demanding answers, about three dozen people gathered in front of the courthouse here Wednesday to see for themselves the
convicted sex offender suspected in the disappearance of a 19-year-old Rancho Santa Margarita student.

But John Steven Burgess never showed. He had slipped in to court the day before and quietly arranged for his court day to be put off for five more weeks.

"Where is Donna Jou? Where is Donna Jou?" the crowd chanted, waving pictures of the long-haired brunette and a stoic Burgess. "Talk, Burgess. Talk."

Ten weeks have passed by since Jou jumped on the back of a motorcycle with 35-year-old Burgess and disappeared.

According to Orange County Sheriff's Department investigators, Burgess filled the time spray painting his blue pickup black, stealing rent money from his roommates
and taking a roundabout trip across the country to his hometown of Jacksonville, Fla. – all with a $1 million California warrant out for his arrest. He was arrested in
Florida in July. There has been no sign of Jou.

Burgess bailed out of a Los Angeles County jail last week, posting $250,000 bond in the sex-offender registration charge. He has not been charged in Jou's
disappearance, but investigators say they believe he is the last person to have seen Jou alive. He remains the only named suspect in the case.

Attorney Gloria Allred, who has etched out her place on the Los Angeles legal scene as an advocate for women's rights and a master of the media, didn't let a no-show
by Burgess deter her from making her debut as the Jou family's advocate.

In a freshly pressed pink pantsuit, Allred hugged Donna Jou's parents, Reza and Nili, as they faced the cameras.

"Please, Mr. Burgess," said Nili Jou, her cheeks stained with tears. "Please, help us to find our daughter. I'm begging you."

"How would you feel if it were your daughter?" Nili Jou wrote in a letter to Burgess. "If she is in danger, wouldn't you want to rescue her? If she is scared, wouldn't
you want to rush to her side and hold her in your arms and tell her you will protect her and everything is going to be OK?"

With a waving motion from Allred, chants of "Justice for Donna" erupted from the crowd of demonstrators.

With a few family members by his side, Burgess walked into court Tuesday morning. George Bird Jr., who is representing Burgess, said he asked to move up Burgess'
appearance to accommodate his own packed schedule, not to avoid the planned protest.

Burgess pleaded not guilty to an amended complaint for failing to register. A preliminary hearing was set for Oct. 10. Burgess has refused to talk to investigators about
Jou because anything he tells them can be used against him in his current criminal case, Bird said.

"The government has silenced him by bringing this case against him," Bird said. "If they dismiss the charges and give him immunity, he's certainly willing to tell them
what he knows."
Wednesday, September 5, 2007
Protest implores suspect for answers
THE DAILY AZTEC
The 19-year-old disappeared nearly three months ago. She was last seen in Orange County riding on the back of a
motorcycle, with convicted sex offender John Burgess.
Dozens of fellow students turned out for the vigil, so did the family's new attorney, Gloria Allred. At the vigil, Allred made a
stunning revelation about Burgess. "Reportedly, he indicated through his attorney, he'd be willing to provide information, if
they dismiss the felony charge." Allred called it a "disgusting deal".
Burgess is free on bail. He will make his next court appearance October 10.
Sept. 12, 2007  
Sept. 16, 2007 Houston, Texas-  Vigil for Donna
John Steven Burgess admitted to trying to steal DVDs from a store in Florida, police say.
By KIMBERLY EDDS
The Orange County Register
A convicted sex offender accused in the disappearance of a local college student had a fake Social Security card and a counterfeit driver's license in his pocket
when he was arrested on suspicion of stealing DVDs from a Jacksonville, Fla., Blockbuster store, authorities said Tuesday.

The arrest is the latest in a series of run-ins with the law for John Steven Burgess, the only named suspect in the disappearance of 19-year-old Donna Jou, who
left her Rancho Santa Margarita apartment June 23 on the back of Burgess' motorcycle. Authorities believe Burgess, 35, was the last person to see Jou alive.

Burgess is due back in a Los Angeles courtroom Oct. 10 to answer charges he failed to register as a sex offender. Burgess bailed out of Los Angeles County jail
last month, posting $250,000 bond in the sex-offender registration charge. A judge reduced his bail from $1 million, saying he could not use Donna Jou's
disappearance as a factor to keep Burgess behind bars.

Without a body and just circumstantial evidence, charges have not been filed against Burgess.

Investigators trying to piece together a case against Burgess in Jou's disappearance said his habit of assuming new identities is not surprising, but it is disturbing.

"The big concern is him having a fake driver's license and Social Security card and what he might do with them," said Sheriff's Department spokesman Jim
Amormino.

A judge can revoke bail if new crimes are committed while someone is out on bail.

"If the allegations are true, it can't bode well upon his return to court," said George Bird, who is representing Burgess.

Jacksonville police said Burgess was arrested Sept. 20 at a Jacksonville Blockbuster with five stolen DVDs stuffed in the pocket of his pants, along with a fake
Social Security card and California drivers' license with the name Logan Anderson and a Hollywood address. The fake IDs came from a Hollywood tourist shop,
according to a police report.

Burgess admitted to taking a razor blade to slice open boxes of DVDs and stuffing them in his pocket, according to the police report. "I'm just being stupid, I
know better, I'm not a thief," Burgess told his arresting officer.


According to Orange County Sheriff's Department investigators, Burgess left Los Angeles on July 6, the same day he was named a person of interest in Jou's
disappearance. Burgess spray-painted his blue pickup black, stole rent money from his roommates and took a trip across the country to Jacksonville – all with a
$1 million California warrant out for his arrest, police said. He was arrested in Florida in July on suspicion of cocaine possession. He spent 25 days in jail – and
was extradited to California to face charges for failing to register.

. It is unclear when Burgess bought the fake identification or what he planned to do with it.

Burgess is refusing to talk to investigators about Jou, but his attorney said he has information about her. Burgess is willing to tell investigators what he knows if
prosecutors will offer him immunity in the failure to register case.
  SEPT. 30, 2007
Oct. 12, 2007, 8:16AM
Convicted sex offender won't help find Clear Lake grad
Sex offender on way to prison mum on fate of teenager
By RUTH RENDON
Houston Chronicle

A man suspected in the disappearance of a Clear Lake High School graduate was sentenced to three years in prison on an unrelated case.

Meanwhile, the whereabouts of Donna Jou, 19, remain unknown. Jou, a San Diego State University honors student, has not been seen since June 23.

Authorities have determined that Jou received phone calls from John Steven Burgess and that he picked her up near her mother's Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif.,
home on his motorcycle that evening. From there the two went to Burgess' Los Angeles home for a party, police said.

Burgess has refused to cooperate with Orange County, Calif., investigators trying to locate Jou, a 2006 Clear Lake High School graduate.

Burgess, 35, was arrested in Florida earlier this year and later extradited to California. On Wednesday, he was sentenced to three years in prison for failing to register
as a sex offender in California, said Jim Amormino, a spokesman for the Orange County Sheriff's Office

"There is no movement on Donna Jou's case," Amormino said Thursday. "Hopefully, when he (Burgess) has time behind bars, he'll have a change of heart."

After Wednesday's court proceedings, Reza Jou, of Nassau Bay, pleaded with Burgess to help find his daughter.

"I don't know where my daughter is," said Reza Jou, an engineer who works on the international space station program. "We have begged Mr. Burgess to tell the
authorities what he knows about Donna and he has refused. We have pleaded to him as father and mother, sister and brother, relative and friend. We have asked him
to look into his heart, as he too is a father, to ask how he would feel if he were in our situation. He has, so far, ignored all of our pleas."

Investigators said Jou met Burgess through the Internet Web site Craig's List. Jou had placed an ad offering her services as a math tutor and Burgess advertised
rooms for rent at his Los Angeles home.

ruth.rendon@chron.com
UPDATES   Oct. 10 , 2007
Celebrating Donna's Birthday  Oct. 14, 2007

A father waits
It has been 5 months since Reza Jou has seen his missing daughter.
By NAYELI PAGAZA
Staff Writer


For the past 160-odd days, Reza Jou has only experienced anguish and desperation.

Each minute his agony grows, knowing little of where his youngest daughter, Donna Jou, is.

"I haven't been able to eat or sleep," he said on the phone from his home in Nassau Bay, Texas. "I can't even swallow water because it hurts. I can't enjoy
anything – thinking of my child and where she could be."

Five months have passed since Jou learned that Donna disappeared from her mother's apartment in Rancho Santa Margarita. She left on a motorcycle with John
Steven Burgess, a convicted child molester, to a party at his rented West Los Angeles home on June 23.

The 35-year-old man is now called a suspect in her disappearance and has been sentenced to three years in prison in an unrelated case.

"This is the first time I don't spend the holidays with my daughter," he said. "I'm waiting to hear my daughter's voice again and spend time with her now."

His priority has been to work with the Los Angeles and Orange County sheriff's departments – which have been investigating the case.

"I go to work but my mind wanders," said the NASA engineer, who has been employed with the agency for 24 years, since finishing college.

Jou said he also plans to work with U.S. Rep. Nick Lampson to help correct, what he says, is a flawed justice system.

"The laws give too many rights to convicted sex offenders," he said. "Burgess for example, wasn't automatically registered as a sex offender when he moved to
California."

Jou thinks that if Burgess had been registered, the tragedy could've been prevented. Burgess, who is also known as Sinjin Stevens, went about a normal life and
posed as a trustworthy person in the eyes of others, Jou said.

"He is eating and sleeping peacefully now, while nobody is taking care of my daughter," he said.

Donna apparently met Burgess after posting an ad on Craigslist.orgoffering math tutoring lessons. The two exchanged messages, but investigators believe June
23 was the first time they met.

"For this was Donna's passion, to trust and help others," reads an excerpt from donnajou.com, the Web site family members set up. "We have hope to bring
Donna home."

Donna, a 19-year-old San Diego State student, maintained a 4.4 GPA and recorded a 1570 score on her SAT.

In high school, Donna volunteered in a battered woman's shelter and told her father of her dream to become a neurosurgeon.

"My daughter is a loving person, she brings smiles and laughter to all who know her," he said.

If you have any information that would help authorities find Donna Jou, call the Los Angeles Police Department at 213-485-2601. There is a $15,000 reward.
Donna Jou made headlines when she disappeared after last being seen in the company of John Burgess, a man whom police believe she
met on Craigslist. Donna, an honor student from Orange County, California, has been missing since June 23, 2007.

Burgess, also known as “Sinjin,” was arrested for stealing DVDs in Florida, and was extradited to Los Angeles to face charges of failing
to register as a sex offender. He was in court on those charges recently, and the family is outraged that he isn’t behind bars in connection
with Donna’s disappearance.

Dr. Phil Now cameras caught up with Donna’s friends and family members outside the courthouse, as they made impassioned pleas for
her return.

“We’re here right now at the Los Angeles courthouse in hopes that John
Burgess will make some kind of plea arrangement,” says Lisa, Donna's sister.

Gloria Allred, attorney for the Jou family, says, "The first thing I would say to John Stephen Burgess is, 'Tell us what you know. Help
this family.'"

When the videotape ends, Dr. Phil turns to Donna’s father, Reza. “This is hard for you to watch and see your daughter,” he
sympathizes. “What is your feeling, and what is your fear, at this point?”

Reza replies, “I’m extremely devastated. I cannot function properly. I have lost some of my feelings. I don’t get thirsty. I cannot sleep.
Basically, I am extremely devastated, and I don’t know what to do.”

“Do you fear that the worst has happened?” Dr. Phil asks Nili, Donna’s mother. “Do you think she’s being held against her will?”

“I do,” she replies. “I am terrified that one day I will find out that my daughter is gone — for four months. But I am hoping that she’ll
be back.”

Lisa expresses her concerns. “I normally have a lot to say, but in this situation, I just walk around scratching my head saying, ‘I don’t
know.’ I just try to be there for Nili and my dad, and try to be supportive, but I don’t know what to think, at this point.”

Dr. Phil addresses Gloria Allred. "[Burgess] is a person of interest. They have not declared this guy a suspect yet?" he asks.

"Reportedly, a prosecutor in one of the bail hearings did use the word 'suspect,' but at least he is a person of interest," Gloria replies.
She reveals that a toolbox belonging to Burgess was found containing rubber gloves, a scrub brush and a rope. "That is something that is
of great concern to us."

"Obviously, he had disguised his car. I understand they think that he painted the car?" Dr. Phil asks.

"Yes. After Nili spoke to him and asked for help in finding her daughter, and after the police began to investigate and began to publicize
his truck and his motorcycle, then the license plate was found, and his motorcycle helmet was found and the other items."

Dr. Phil consults his notes. "Here are some things that we know about him: Convicted in '02 on three counts of battery, convicted in '03
for performing a lewd act on a child," he reads. He turns to Nili. "Did she meet him on Craigslist?"

"I'm sure she didn't know who Mr. Burgess is when she answered the ad," Nili replies.

Gloria adds, "She was advertising as a math tutor, helping students, helping in the way Donna always helped everyone, all of her life.
This is a young woman who not only had a 4.0 average, but she babysat at battered women shelters. She helped to collect food for the
poor and distribute it through her ministry, and this is person who, perhaps, was very, very trusting, but she was not dating him, as we
know."
The family recently held a 20th birthday celebration for Donna as they hold out hope that she is still alive.
streamers. As Nili curls a helium balloon string, however, she breaks down, unable to continue.
"We have 20 candles for her birthday and one for good luck," Gloria announces, as friends and family blow out the candles. "What I wish for her is to be here.
That's all I need. That's all I want," Nili says.
"She was seen getting on the back of a motorcycle, right?" Dr. Phil asks Gloria.
"Yes, by Nili, her mom," she replies.

Dr. Phil addresses Nili. "You actually saw her get on the back of the motorcycle. You then heard from her later, at a party, via text message. Do you believe that
was really her at the party?"

"No, sir. I don't," she answers. She explains that Donna normally uses shorthand when she sends text messages, and this message contained complete words.
"It was different from the rest. And she capitalized 'Mommy.' The M for Mommy. She never did that."

Dr. Phil wants Gloria to break down the legalities of the case. "[Burgess] has said that he has information and will share it if they'll deal with him on this other
charge?" he asks.

"That's what he said to his attorney previously. He also told Nili that he would help. Of course, he didn't call back," she reveals. "But we say how offensive, how
reprehensible, to play 'Let's make a deal' when a young woman's life is at stake."
Gloria holds up a stack of greeting cards. "We had members of her family write birthday cards, how they feel about Donna Jou to Donna," she explains. "I'm
going to send one to Mr. Burgess [every day], to let him know how her family feels about her, and how much at a loss they are without her, and let him just
have to think about Donna Jou every day until he opens up, and gives us the information that they deserve to have."

"So he's in jail for three years, and maybe a year and a half, with good behavior?" Dr. Phil inquires. "If he is manipulative, if he's greedy — I'm sorry — why not
make the deal? Why not say, ‘OK, you can go half of your time, or you can do this’ if it helps find where this girl is? At this point, is there no leverage with him
at all?”

"Well, I think the leverage is going to be what the results of the investigation are by the Los Angeles Police Department, and by Orange County law
enforcement,” Gloria explains. “If, as and when they can put pieces together of the puzzle, and if they are able to refer to the prosecutor, and if he decides to file
a case, then there is some leverage with him to disclose the information. We’ll have to wait and see.”

Dr. Phil instructs Nili to look into the camera and address Burgess directly. “Tell him now what you want to tell him to bring your daughter home,” he says.

Taking a deep breath, Nili says, “Mr. Burgess, you came to my apartment and picked up my daughter. Since then, we don’t know where she is. We don’t know
what happened to her that night. Since then, we are begging you, we are pleading with you, please, help us. Put us out of this misery and agony. We need to
know what happened to our daughter. She’s our life. So many people are affected. You cannot imagine how many people — overseas, here — we are affected.
We miss her so much. You have a daughter. Please. You are sitting in jail. Think about it. We just need to know what happened, and where Donna is now. We
want her to be home with us, with her family.”

Reza adds, "I just want to beg him, once more, I love my daughter. I want her back, and I will fight until the last day of my life. I want my child back. I cannot
live without her, and I will do everything in my power to bring my child back home."
Gloria promises to keep Dr. Phil posted on Donna's case. If anyone has information about the disappearance of Donna Jou, please go to www.DonnaJou.com,
and also contact the Los Angeles Police Department. "We want to bring Donna home. She has a wonderful, loving family. No mother and no father, should have
to be subjected to a nightmare like this," she says.

Dr. Phil instructs Nili to look into the camera and address Burgess directly. “Tell him now what you want to tell him to bring your daughter home,” he says.

Taking a deep breath, Nili says, “Mr. Burgess, you came to my apartment and picked up my daughter. Since then, we don’t know where she is. We don’t know
what happened to her that night. Since then, we are begging you, we are pleading with you, please, help us. Put us out of this misery and agony. We need to
know what happened to our daughter. She’s our life. So many people are affected. You cannot imagine how many people — overseas, here — we are affected.
We miss her so much. You have a daughter. Please. You are sitting in jail. Think about it. We just need to know what happened, and where Donna is now. We
want her to be home with us, with her family.”

Reza adds, "I just want to beg him, once more, I love my daughter. I want her back, and I will fight until the last day of my life. I want my child back. I cannot
live without her, and I will do everything in my power to bring my child back home."

Gloria promises to keep Dr. Phil posted on Donna's case. If anyone has information about the disappearance of Donna Jou, please go to www.DonnaJou.com,
and also contact the Los Angeles Police Department. "We want to bring Donna home. She has a wonderful, loving family. No mother and no father, should have
to be subjected to a nightmare like this," she says.
Dr. Phil show  aired Wednesday December 5, 2007
Friday, November 30, 2007
Saturday, December 29, 2007
Search for Donna
Statements given by Gloria and Nili at  Press Conference.
December. 28, 2007
MALIBU -- Volunteers are being sought for a weekend search in Malibu for Donna Jou, an Orange County college student who went missing
June 23.

More than 30 volunteers and attorney Gloria Allred, who represents the Jou family, will search for Jou in Allred said.

Volunteer searchers can register online at www.trinitysearch.org, Allred said.

Donna Jou was 19 years old when she hopped on the back of a motorcycle driven by John Steven Burgess, 35, a convicted sex criminal, on June
23. That was the last time her family saw her, and brief text messages from her phone indicate that she was locked in a bathroom and in danger
at Burgess' house, her family said.

Burgess is considered a suspect -- but has not been charged -- in the disappearance of Jou, whose family lives in Rancho Santa Margarita. He
pleaded no contest Oct. 10 in a Los Angeles courtroom to two counts of failing to register as a sex offender and was sentenced to three years in
prison.

Burgess has not given any hints about Jou's whereabouts.

Deputy District Attorney Christi Frey said after an October hearing that Burgess' attorney, George F. Bird Jr., "said he can't advise his client to
talk about anything that might incriminate him. He still has the right to remain silent, the right not to incriminate himself. And we can't force
him to talk."
More than 30 volunteers and attorney Gloria Allred, who represents the Jou family,  search
for Jou in the Santa Monica Mountains  with the assistance of Trinity Search & Recovery

The group scours Santa Monica Mountains in search of clues about an Orange County college student missing for six months.
By Jean-Paul Renaud, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer

The search for a missing 19-year-old female college student brought together a diverse ensemble of volunteers Saturday hoping to find
answers to a formidable question: What happened to Donna Jou six months ago?

About 100 relatives and friends -- even a former girlfriend of the man police have named as their prime suspect in Jou's disappearance --
scattered throughout the Santa Monica mountains in Malibu looking for clues.

"It happened six months ago, but it feels like it was yesterday," said Nili Jou, the missing girl's mother. "I want to start the new year with
my daughter beside me."

The search was organized by Mike Melson, who started his nonprofit Christian search group Trinity Search & Recovery earlier this year
after seeing other volunteers participate in previous search efforts. "I was embarrassed as a native Californian that people in Arkansas
and Texas and North Carolina were coming to California to help find missing people," said Melson, whose group is based in Pleasanton,
Calif. "We're a Christian organization, and I feel it's important that we get out of the pews and help our neighbors."

Los Angeles police detectives say Jou, a student at San Diego State University, met John Steven Burgess on the popular website
Craigslist.com. The two were last seen together at Burgess' West Los Angeles home June 23.

Burgess, a registered sex offender who is serving a three-year prison sentence for not reporting his residence to authorities, has refused to
talk to police about Jou's disappearance.

Authorities already unsuccessfully searched the mountains, a vast territory that detectives believe Burgess frequented. They did not join
Saturday's search.

Others did, however, including Burgess' former girlfriend.

"I just felt when I lived with him, he did creepy things with me," said Missy Prusinski, 25, who also met Burgess on Craigslist and stayed
with him for three weeks. "I just thought he was a creepy guy."

Melson said the extensive Santa Monica Mountains still could hold clues to Jou's whereabouts, even though another organized search
launched by the Texas-based private search firm Equusearch came up empty three months ago.

"There are some folks out there that feel very cynical about a search like this," Melson told the crowd that gathered at Malibu Bluffs Park
to help. "I think anyone here would do the same if our daughter was missing."

Volunteers were instructed to look for items that might help investigators. Melson recounted details of that June night to the scores of
searchers who surrounded him:

Burgess picked Jou up on a black motorcycle at her parents' home in Rancho Santa Margarita. Both wore helmets as they sped off, family
members recall. The motorcycle and one of the helmets have not been found. Jou wore a navy blue JanSport book bag; multicolored,
checkered Vans tennis shoes; and a gold diamond-studded horseshoe necklace.

As he addressed the volunteers, Melson paused, leaned down and whispered into Nili Jou's ear. He wanted to warn her about what he was
about to say next. "Unfortunately, we also have to acknowledge the fact that we may find Donna up there," Melson told his searchers. "If
Donna is up there, we will find some type of human remains. If you do find human remains, you will know it."

Finally, Melson handed his searchers maps of the region divided into 24 zones and told them to stay on the main road.

"If you can't go off the road, [Jou's abductor] probably wouldn't have stopped either."

The all-day search turned up a book bag, a dumped motorcycle and a helmet. None was linked to Jou, however.

The search will continue again this morning.

"We won't give up until we find Donna," said the family's attorney, Gloria Allred. "And good people will help us."
The Malibu Times
Jan. 8- 2008
Search for missing student contiunes

by Christina Nguyen, News Editor
January 8, 2008 3:40 PM     


The search for a missing SF State student continued last weekend as friends and family combed the Santa Monica Mountains for clues.

Donna Jou, 19, was last seen on June 23, 2007, riding on the back of a motorcycle with John Steven Burgess, a convicted sex offender she
met on Craigslist.org. While the Los Angeles Police Department has not name him as a suspect, Burgess has not yielded information. A tip
initiated the search effort after Burgess was seen in the area multiple times.

Trinity Search and Recovery, a Pleasanton-based organization, coordinated 100 volunteers who searched the area from Dec. 29 through Jan.
6. No items connected to Jou were recovered.

The LAPD request that anyone with additional information about the Jou case call (213) 485-2531.
Jan. 2,  2008
December 30, 2007
Donna 's Family and
Attorney Gloria Allred
appeared in Dr. Phil's
show
on December 5, 2007 to
talk about Donna's
disappearance .
Bellow is the links to this
interviews in 3 parts.
Feb. 12- 2008
Dec. 5- 2008
Feb. 29- 2008
March 28- 2008
Reported by National Geographic Chanel on April 04, 2008   
Another Body Search in The Same Marina
Molly Mayock
Service Producer
April 04, 2008

Just a few days after the underwater dive search for the missing man from Hollywood, we got a call from the Port Police about another
suspected missing person possibly dumped here at the same marina. Immediately I sent a camera crew to accompany the Port Police Dive Team on this sensitive
operation run in conjunction with LAPD and the Los
Angeles County Sheriff's Department. This time the subject was a 19-year-old girl whose disappearance in June
2007 made national news after she went out on a date with a man she met on Craigslist and never returned home. The man turned out to be a convicted sex offender
who reportedly kept a boat in this marina.
The last thing the police wanted to happen during their underwater body search was a media circus. Our presence there was a sensitive issue, so we kept things really
low key so as not to attract the attention of
local and national media, who would have surely swarmed the many public places around the marina and hovered in helicopters above. Police feared the onslaught of
camera crews would potentially interfere with this sensitive dive operation.
In fact, to this day, I don't believe any media outlet has found out that the police did an underwater search of a marina in the Port of Los
Angeles. Our entire crew did a really good job of keeping this information on the down-low.
The national media will probably be very surprised when they learn all the details about this part of the investigation, which will be
presented in the second episode of America's Port airing on April 7, 2008.
June  23 - 2008
June 23, 2008 Donna's Candle Light vigil (first anniversary of her abduction)

Respectable family members, including extended family/honorable Gloria
Allred who has joined us with a sense
of urgency and passion in pursuit of justice for Donna, friends, and
supporters including Ms. Noelle Stillman
from National Center for Missing Children.

As you know, it has been one year today since my precious daughter, Donna,
disappeared from our lives.
Donna is still an integral part of me; her image still is very much in my mind.

I am sad; My world has been turned upside down by this terrible tragedy. Her
loss has changed me. The light
that used to guide me to live life with a sense of joy and passion barely
flickers today. At times, I feel my life
lacks purpose and that I have little reason to go on without her.

Yet I can not bring myself to say goodbye to Donna in the absence of
conclusive evidence that she will not come back
to use alive. Every waking moments of every day, I hope and pray for new
leads to Donna's whereabouts.

I feel strongly that we have not reached the point where we should give up
hope. My heart and soul tell me to
hold on and to cherish the thought that "see you soon" still describes what we
believe will be the ultimate
outcome of this case.

This has been a dreadful experience for me and my family, especially with
mystery and suspense. It goes
beyond my worst nightmare. I will persist and stop at nothing to find my
daughter, reunite with her or find
closure.

My love for my daughter, my terrible grief, and the rage I feel for her
abductor and our system of justice that
seems so often to favor the criminal's rights over the victim's, will keep me
going as long as it takes to find
her. If it takes my entire life, so be it. I hold on till I take my last breath.

What we need so much is to keep Donna's disappearance before the public.
We can not afford to have this
case go "cold" as that will truly be the death knell for my beautiful girl.

We need to keep this case fresh in the minds of the public eye in any and
every way we can. Sooner or later,
someone, somewhere will recognize Donna and provide us the information
we need.

Thank you all for being here with us this evening and for having been with us
throughout this last difficult year
of our lives. Certainly, words can not express how much my family and I
appreciate you for your steadfast
support and the love you have shown us all.

I know you will keep Donna close to your hearts and, hopefully the
combination of your care and concern,
plus our success at keeping Donna's face and story on TV and in the press,
will result in a happy ending to
this long, difficult ordeal.

Again, my family and I thank you so much for everything.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------Reza Jou
April 4 - 2008
Documentary video produce
by Spanish media
In this week's edition of "The Missing," we revisit the mysterious disappearance of Donna Jou, a 19-year-old resident of Rancho Santa Margarita,
California, who went missing on June 23, 2007.

"We as a family are devastated, and our life has been torn apart," Donna's father, Reza Jou, said in a telephone interview with Investigation Discovery.
"Every single day we hope and pray that we will find her."

On the day of her disappearance, Donna told her mother, Nili Jou, that one of her friend's boyfriends was going to pick her up and take her to a house
party in Santa Monica. At about 5:30 p.m., a man on a motorcycle pulled up in front of the house, and Donna ran out to meet him. Moments later, she was
on the back of his bike, and they were on their way down the street.

"When he came here, he had a helmet on, and nobody saw his face," Reza said, adding, "Donna didn't even see his face."

Later that night, Donna called a friend in San Diego and said that she was calling from a bathroom inside the house where the man had taken her.

"She said her friend was not there and that the guy who had picked her up was really freaking her out," Reza said. "She said he was acting odd and would
not get the hint that she was not interested in him. She did not ask for help, so I think she thought that the man would take her back home."

Sometime after midnight, Nili received a text message from her daughter that read, "I WILL BE HOME SOON. LOVE YOU MOMMY." Nili found the
message odd because it was written in all caps, and "Mommy" was not a term her daughter would typically use. The next day, at about 6:08 p.m., Nili
received a second text message from her daughter, which read, "I am in San Diego. I love you Mommy. I am coming home." That would prove to be the
last contact ever made from Donna's phone. The following day, her parents called the police and reported their daughter missing.

"When the police came, they took the laptop that Donna had been using to the crime lab," Reza said. "When they looked at it, they discovered that Donna
had been corresponding with a man she [had] met on Craigslist [an Internet community for posting classified advertisements]."

According to Reza, Donna, an honor student at San Diego State University, had offered tutoring services on the Web site, and the man had contacted her in
response to her advertisement.

"We really don't know how my daughter was convinced to meet him," Reza said. "The police found photos on the computer that the man had sent her, in
which he looked to be about 20 years old."

Investigators traced the Internet messages to 35-year-old John Steven Burgess, aka Sinjin Stevens, a sex offender who had been convicted of performing a
lewd act against a child, in 2003, and of three counts of battery, in 2002.

On July 5, investigators traced Burgess to a West Los Angeles area house that he had been renting with five other people. Unfortunately, he was nowhere
to be found. When questioned, Burgess's roommates told police that they had last seen him earlier that day loading his truck with cardboard boxes. When
asked if they had seen Donna, all of the roommates reported that she had been at the house on the night of June 23, but none of them had seen her since.
The following day, police issued an APB on Burgess's black motorcycle and his 1998 blue Ford Ranger pickup, with California license tag SIN-JIN-1.

While police actively searched for Burgess and his truck, a man called police on July 8 and reported finding a plastic tool box in the weeds, approximately a
mile and a half from Burgess's apartment. Inside, police found a black motorcycle helmet, rubber gloves, rope, a scrub brush and the SIN-JIN-1 vanity
plate. The following day, police executed a search warrant on Burgess's apartment and confiscated several knives.

On July 26, police in Jacksonville, Florida, arrested Burgess for possession of crack cocaine; however, at the time, they were unaware of his true identity.

"He gave the police the wrong identification," Reza said. "When they were booking him in the jail, they did the fingerprints, and that was when they found
out he was the man that California was looking for. They got a hold of California authorities and told them they had him. The detectives from California
went to Jacksonville and questioned him about Donna, but he declined to talk and asked for a lawyer."

Burgess remained behind bars in California until August 2006, when California had him extradited to appear in court for failing to register as a sex
offender. Following his arraignment, Burgess posted bail in the amount of $250,000 and was released from jail. About this time, police named him as an
official suspect in the disappearance of Donna Jou. As a result, Burgess hit the road and hightailed it back to Florida, where, approximately three weeks
later, he was arrested for theft.

"The bond company revoked his bond, and he was again extradited to California," Reza said. "When he got there, he was back in court, and the judge
doubled his bond to $500,000 and ordered him not to leave the city of Los Angeles."

While Burgess was imprisoned in the county jail, Nili went and sat down with him for a face-to-face meeting.

"He told her he did not hurt Donna and that he had no reason to do so," Reza said. "He said he was drunk [at the party] and did not know where she had
gone."

Burgess remained in the county jail until October 10, 2007, when he was sentenced to three years in state prison for failing to register as a sex offender.
Following the hearing, Burgess was transferred to Wasco State Prison, where he remains as of this writing.

Reza hopes his daughter is still alive and says he has considered the possibility that she may have been sold as a sex slave.

"Burgess has been involved in many shady activities in the past, including the porn industry, and it is possible that he has sold my child as a sex slave to
someone. Maybe he is afraid to speak because the people behind it may be bigger than him and he might be afraid for his life."

Police have yet to charge Burgess in Donna's disappearance. According to Reza, they do not feel they have enough evidence to ensure a conviction.

"They are concerned about a hung jury," Reza said. "If they don't have enough evidence, they can't try him again because of double jeopardy. That is why
they are trying very hard to gather information. We have hired attorney Gloria Allred to work with authorities in California. She is our liaison. But so far,
they have not told us the details of what they have, and every time I go meet with them face to face, they tell me to trust that they are doing everything
possible."

When asked if there was anything he would like to say to his daughter, Reza responded:

"I want to tell her that I love her immensely and that no matter what condition or shape she is in, I will love her and accept her. I want her back in my life.
That is the message I want to send to her."

Donna Jou is described as a white female, 5'3" tall, 110 lbs., with brown hair and brown eyes. Anyone with information is asked to call the Los Angeles
Police Department at 213-485-2601 or Detective Ito at 213-485-2531. A $15,000 reward is being offered for any information leading to the discovery of
Donna's whereabouts.
July  15 - 2008
Oct.  19 - 2008
Dedicated video made for  
Donna's birthday
Sept.  25 - 2009
Search for missing Donna Jou resumes
                                   REZA's MESSAGE  ON DONNA'S BIRTHDAY  (May 18, 2009)                         

                                         
HAPPY BIRTHDAY MY DEAREST, DONNA


Today is your birthday, this is the 3rd birthday without your presence, we don’t know where you are and what happened to you, so much has
happened; I have so much to tell you. When you were just a phone call away or 3.5 hrs airplane ride and now it is 842 long, grueling days since
John Steven Burgess snatched you, lured you away from safety of your home – it is difficult to fathom. Time continues to tick and the minutes
turn into years with more questions than answers.

I was profoundly disturbed when I heard the verdict on May 18, 2009. I didn’t accept the verdict as the end of my crusade to seek justice for you.
It left long lasting scars. You were victimized by violence, and justice was not fully served. The verdict sends a clear message that the criminal
justice system still fails to respect the civil rights of innocent victims. This is painful and emotionally gut-wrenching to emerge from this crime.

I have cried so much! Then I have to stop because they wont
let me just cry for long so then I cry when I am alone.
I become overwhelmingly depressed. I miss what I had and fear
what I am now a part of. I remember feeling so bad that I could no
longer eat... But then they make sure I eat...

I had to be able to witness my daughter’s disappearance and then go to work the next day. And all along I had to pretend that nothing was
wrong... I had to survive any way possible...
Then somehow in the process of this, it becomes my world. It becomes my normal. It becomes my life. I do this by instinct. I am set with a
natural instinct to survive! I become numb to the reality of what I am in. I become numb to the danger. I become numb to the pain. I can not
forget what I had that was so wonderful before I new reality. If every day I remembered where I once was before I could NOT live to look for
you, to seek justice for you.

The pain of suddenly losing you, without explanation, is a horrible heartache beyond comprehension for me.
I love you Donna with my whole heart and miss you so much,

HAPPY BIRTHDAY MY PRECIOUS BABY M……..
Your Dad, Reza
March.  26 - 2010
FATHER FIGHTS SETS OUT TO CHANGE CALIFORNIA LAW
NASSAU BAY -- Reza Jou, whose daughter Donna disappeared from San Diego State University three years ago, has set out to
change a California law he fears will allow the man convicted of her death out of prison too soon.
John Steven Burgess was sentenced to five years in prison last year for his confessed role in Donna Jou's death. Under
California law, Burgess could be released as early as next April for good behavior.

"Half of me is gone," said Jou, an engineer for the International Space Station.  "I don't feel like a whole person." Jou told
11News he was on a crusade to change the law in California and eventually every state in the country.

His daughter was last seen in 2007 at a party hosted by Burgess. Burgess, a three-time convicted sex offender, admitted to
drugging her and getting rid of her body. "We almost fell from the chair when the District Attorney told us that [Burgess] killed
your daughter.  He said, "Yes, I killed her.  And put her on a boat.  And dumped her in the Pacific Ocean." Searchers never
found her.
With no body -- and other evidence to connect Burgess to Jou -- a California judged gave him the harshest punishment possible
under state law for involuntary manslaughter. It's a scenario prosecutors said could play out in Texas.  Jou has taken his fight to
the California legislature and to members of Congress.
"I'm going to spend all my resources," he said.  "Even if I have to sell the house.  Everything that I have.  Because I have to ...
push for change."
Jou said increasing the maximum penalty for similar crimes could help spare other families his anguish.
(CBS 8) - She vanished in 2007 after taking a motorcycle ride with a convicted sex offender she met online. Now there could be closure for her family.

John Burgess is serving five years in prison for admitting his role in the death of San Diego State University student Donna Jou, but her body has never
been found.

Will a human skull and bones found in an abandoned marijuana grove in the Malibu area finally provide missing SDSU freshman Donna Jou's relatives
the answer they have been waiting for over the past three years?

"For us there's never going to be closure, because for us we have lost something that we cannot get over it," father Reza Jou said.

State rangers found the remains in treacherous terrain in Malibu Creek State Park. The L.A. County coroner will try to determine if they are those of
the 19-year-old who left home with John Stephen Burgess, who's sitting in prison on involuntary manslaughter and body concealing charges.

Burgess says he gave Donna Jou cocaine, heroin and alcohol at his L.A. County home. When he woke up the next morning, she was dead. He says he
panicked and used his sailboat to dump her body in the ocean.

Jou's father says multiple searches turned up nothing.

"No DNA left on the house, on the truck on the boat -- nothing. There is no witness to come forward with any useful information," Reza Jou said.

He says Burgesses friends told authorities he loved spending time in Malibu Canyon, near where the remains were just discovered.

Because of his good behavior, Burgess is set to be released from prison next April -- something not sitting well with the missing girl's family.

"He's going to be free to do more crimes, destroy more families, and we are very upset," Reza Jou said.

Donna Jou's family actually hired a company to search the Santa Monica Mountains in December 2007, but even with nearly 200 people combing the
rugged terrain, they could not find any evidence.
August.  1 - 2010
September.  28 - 2010
Donna Jou, What Really Happened To You?
April. 6-13-2011
John Steven Burgess to remain jailed
April. 15-2011
April. 17-2011
May. 5-2011
June. 23-2011
June. 24-2011
DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- The family of missing
college student Donna Jou does not want her name forgotten and
are pressing to have her murder case reopened.
Oct.  2011
Dec.  2011
July 24, 2012  
A sex offender who served state prison time in the death of 19-year-old coed Donna Jou was arrested at his Hollywood residence on suspicion of violating parole for
allegedly possessing ammunition, Los Angeles police said Tuesday.

John Steven "Sinjin" Burgess, 42, was taken into custody Monday after two women who were offered a rent-free living arrangement at his Hollywood apartment
contacted KTLA-TV, claiming they saw drugs at the residence, LAPD officials said. The reporter then called police.

In a cursory search of the residence, police found ammunition, said LAPD Cmdr. Andrew Smith. Police will make a more extensive search of the home Tuesday.

Burgess pleaded guilty in 2009 to involuntary manslaughter in the disappearance and death of Jou, a San Diego State Pre -med student. Under a plea deal, Burgess was
sentenced to five years. In April 2011, Burgess was released from state custody in Chico after serving two years.

He was then taken into custody in Los Angeles County. He was released from jail in December after serving half his sentence.

Burgess told authorities that Jou,  from Rancho Santa Margarita, died of a drug overdose in June 2007. He said he panicked and dumped her body in the ocean; her
body has never been recovered.

Jou's family has continued to press prosecutors to reopen the investigation.
Sept  13, 2012  
Man Convicted In Death Of Donna Jou Faces
Trial For Ammunition Possession
Nov. 28,  2012  
                            Parolee in Donna Jou case heading back to prison

LOS ANGELES—A Los Angeles parolee who served time in connection with the disappearance of a
San Diego State University student has been sentenced to four more years in prison after pleading
no contest to being a felon in possession of ammunition.
The district attorney's office says John Steven Burgess entered the plea Wednesday.
In 2009, Burgess pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter in the 2007 death of 19-year-old Donna
Jou (joh), whose body was never found.
The convicted sex offender claimed that while partying he gave Jou cocaine and heroin, found her
dead and dumped her body in the ocean.
Burgess served half of a five-year sentence and was paroled. Two women who subsequently
answered his Craigslist ad seeking roommates discovered his identity and contacted police, who
found ammunition at his residence.
       Donna Jou killer gets four years in prison on ammunition charge

A sex offender convicted of killing a San Diego State University nursing student was sentenced to four years in prison
Wednesday after pleading no contest to being a felon in possession of ammunition, officials said.

Judge Craig Richman handed down the maximum sentence to John Steven Burgess, 40, the L.A. County district attorney's
office said. Police said they discovered the ammunition during an investigation into a Craigslist ad Burgess posted looking
for roommates.

Two women answered the ad, which Burgess posted after he was released from prison on parole in December. After learning
his true identity, prosecutors said, the women called police.

Burgess pleaded guilty in 2009 to involuntary manslaughter in the 2007 death of honor student Donna Jou, who he claimed
died of a drug overdose. He said he panicked and dumped her body in the ocean "quite a ways" off the Southern California
coast. It has never been found.

Under a plea deal, Burgess was sentenced to five years in prison. He served half the sentence and was released in
December.

Burgess met Jou through Craigslist, authorities said.

When arguing the ammunition case, Deputy Dist. Atty. Bobby Grace said Burgess also violated the terms of his parole "by
using social media sites and computers to meet women," the district attorney's office said.

"He still hasn't learned his lesson," Grace said when asking for the maximum senten
ce.